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CURRENT ISSUETHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,413

Frequency: Quarterly

ISSN 1824-4785

Online ISSN 1827-1936

 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine 2003 March;47(1):3-7

THERAPY RESPONSE IN NUCLEAR MEDICINE
Guest Editor: Bombardieri E. 

On the development of rational standards for nuclear response evaluation

Laking G. R. 1, Price P. M. 2, and EORTC Functional Imaging Group 3

1 The Cancer Research UK PET Oncology Group Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom
2 The Cancer Research UK PET Oncology Group Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom
3 EORTC Functional Imaging Group The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels, Belgium

Aim. Small variations in test protocols can disproportionately affect the sensitivity and specificity of response evaluation in nuclear medicine. Although use of standardised methods can remedy this, standards must be shown to add value. We think a concept of “societal efficacy” is the benchmark criterion for value of medical interventions. This paper gives an overview of literature on nuclear response evaluation, and promotes a decision-analytic approach to the synthesis of standards.
Methods. A Medline search using the OVID database, 1966-January 2002. Reports were organised in relation to mode of treatment and timing of follow-up evaluation. Protocols of multimodality treatment were classified according to the treatment with the greatest tissue-inflammatory potential. The database will be made available on-line at the Website of the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Functional Imaging Group (http://www.eortc.be).
Results. Two hundred and twelve reports could be classified as primary studies in humans. 125 were formal “before-and-after” studies of response to anticancer therapy. More than 60 reported the use of serial positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG).
Conclusion. Descriptive reports of the accuracy and applications of new diagnostic technologies need to be linked to an expectation of improved research or clinical outcomes. To manage the large volume of information will require a trans-disciplinary perspective and use of advanced decision-analytic methods. At stake is the possibility of an “industrial” upscaling of one of nuclear oncology' strongest applications.

language: English


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