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CURRENT ISSUETHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine 2001 June;45(2):179-82

RADIOPHARMACOLOGY 

Tumor angiogenesis targeting using imaging agents

Weber W. A., Haubner R., Vabuliene E., Kuhnast B., Wester H. J., Schwaiger M.

From the Depart­ment of ­Nuclear Med­i­cine Tech­nische ­Universität, ­München, Ger­many

The inhi­bi­tion of ­tumor ­induced angio­gen­esis is an ­emerging ther­a­peutic ­strategy in clin­ical ­oncology ­aimed at ­halting ­cancer pro­gres­sion by sup­pressing ­tumor ­blood ­supply. As ­anti-angio­genic ­therapy is pri­marily cytos­tatic and not cyto­toxic, the estab­lished cri­teria for ­assessing ­tumor ­response to ­chemo- and radio­therapy ­cannot be ­applied to ­anti-angio­genic ­therapy. There­fore, func­tional and molec­ular param­e­ters for ­imaging of ­tumor angio­gen­esis are ­being inten­sively ­studied. Com­puted tomog­raphy, mag­netic res­o­nance ­imaging, ultra­sound and scin­ti­graphic tech­niques can ­assess ­changes in vas­cular perme­ability and ­tumor ­blood ­flow ­during ­anti-angio­genic ­therapy. Scin­ti­graphic tech­niques, espe­cially posi­tron emis­sion tomog­raphy (PET), may be ­used to mon­itor the con­se­quences of ­anti-angio­genic ­therapy on ­tumor ­cell metab­olism, pro­life­ra­tion and apop­tosis. The ­high sen­si­tivity of PET ­which ­allows meas­ure­ments of ­tracer con­cen­tra­tions in the pico­molar ­range is prom­ising for the vis­u­al­iza­tion of spe­cific molec­ular tar­gets ­prior to ­therapy ­thus iden­ti­fying ­patients ­most ­likely ben­efit ­from a par­tic­ular ­form of ­anti-angio­genic ­therapy.

language: English


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