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CURRENT ISSUETHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine 2000 March;44(1):96-101

NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS
Guest Editors: Bombardieri E. 

New clinical trials for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors

Bajetta E., Bichisao E. *, Artale S., Celio L., Ferrari L., Di Bartolomeo M., Zilembo N., Stani S. C., Buzzoni R.

From the Unit of Oncology B
*Medical Office, Italian Trials in Medical Oncology (­ITMO)
Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan, Italy

In oncol­o­gy ­there is an increas­ing inter­est in neu­ro­en­do­crine ­tumors, ­whose inci­dence is gen­er­al­ly con­sid­ered low, ­although in a ­recent anal­y­sis of 5,468 cas­es ­there was an ­increase in the pro­por­tion of pul­mo­nary and gas­tric car­ci­noids and a ­decrease in the appen­di­ceal car­ci­noids. However car­ci­noid ­tumors are indo­lent and ­their diag­no­sis is ­often dif­fi­cult to car­ry out, so the ­true inci­dence may be high­er. Surgery ­remains the treat­ment of ­choice and it ­should ­always be con­sid­ered in ­patients ­with neu­ro­en­do­crine ­tumors ­although a com­plete ­cure is dif­fi­cult to ­obtain. Cytotoxic chem­o­ther­a­py is the med­i­cal treat­ment for high­ly pro­life­rat­ing neu­ro­en­do­crine ­tumors, but it has ­showed a mod­est ben­e­fit. Somatostatin ana­logues, octre­o­tide and lan­re­o­tide are the stan­dard hor­mo­nal treat­ment for neu­ro­en­do­crine ­tumors. Recently, two ­trials on lan­re­o­tide and octre­o­tide ­have ­been pub­lished, and it is ­worth not­ing ­that in ­each ­trial a ­long-act­ing for­mu­la­tion has ­been ­used: for lan­re­o­tide a pro­longed-­release for­mu­la­tion (PR) ­which ­allows an injec­tion of 30 mg eve­ry 2 ­weeks, and for octre­o­tide a ­long-act­ing ­release for­mu­la­tion (LAR) ­which ­allows an injec­tion of 10, 20 or 30 mg eve­ry 28 ­days. The ­results of ­each ­trial are ­very prom­is­ing.
However, ­there are method­o­log­i­cal and clin­i­cal ­aspects ­which ­make it dif­fi­cult to car­ry out new ­trials for stud­y­ing neu­ro­en­do­crine ­tumors. The increas­ing num­ber of bio­log­i­cal mark­ers ­deserve fur­ther inves­ti­ga­tions ­before ­their ­wide use in clin­i­cal prac­tice.

language: English


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