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Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 2014 September;58(3):151-60

language: English

Nutritional treatment for acute and chronic traumatic brain injury patients

Curtis L. 1, Epstein P. 2

1 Medical Writer and Researcher, Forest Hills, NY, USA;
2 Neurologist and Psychiatrist, Advanced Neurodiagnostics, Wheeling, IL, USA


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Proper nutrition is critical for recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Prompt enteral feeding of moderate to severe TBI patients has been associated with significantly lower mortality and rates of infection. Probiotic supplementation has been associated with significantly lower rates of infection in TBI and other trauma patients. Human studies have suggested that supplementation with omega 3 fats, vitamin D, N-Acetylcysteine, branched chain aminoacids, and zinc may be helpful for recovery from TBI. Animal TBI models have suggested that alpha-lipoic acid, magnesium, taurine, coenzyme Q10, and many phytonutrients (such as resveratrol) are also helpful. Unfortunately, recent human clinical trials with citicoline in TBI and stroke patients have produced disappointing results. Much more research is needed on multifaceted nutritional strategies to treat TBI patients in both the immediate post-injury phase and throughout the patients lifespan.

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luketcurtis@aol.com