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CURRENT ISSUEJOURNAL OF NEUROSURGICAL SCIENCES

A Journal on Neurosurgery


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Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences 1999 June;43(2):135-9

 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Intra­me­dul­lary ­increased MR sig­nal inten­sity ­and ­its rela­tion to clin­i­cal fea­tures in cer­vi­cal mye­lop­a­thy

Puzzilli F., MAstronardi L., Ruggeri A., Lunardi P.

Depart­ment of Neu­ro­log­i­cal Sci­enc­es, Neu­ro­sur­gery II, Uni­ver­sity “La Sapien­za”, ­Rome, Ita­ly

Back­ground. Are­as of intra­me­dul­lary hyper­intensity in ­patients ­with cer­vi­cal spon­dy­log­e­net­ic mye­lop­a­thy (­CSM) ­have ­been ­described ­and stud­ied by sev­er­al ­authors.
Meth­ods. In ­the ­present ­study, 100 ­patients ­were reap­praised ­and divid­ed ­into 2 ­groups accord­ing to wheth­er or ­not ­MRI detect­ed are­as of hyper­in­ten­sity on T2-weight­ed imag­es.
­Results. Sta­tis­ti­cal anal­y­sis dem­on­strat­ed ­that intra­me­dul­lary hyper­in­ten­sity is ­most fre­quent­ly asso­ciat­ed ­with ­severe impair­ment of deam­bu­la­tion, mus­cu­lar hypo­to­nus-hypo­tro­phy ­and hypo­es­the­sias of ­the ­upper ­limbs.
Con­clu­sions. ­These radio­log­i­cal find­ings prob­ably cor­re­spond to var­i­ous ­types of ­lesions ­which, ­when irre­ver­sible, ­may influ­ence post­op­er­a­tive neu­ro­log­i­cal recov­ery.

language: English


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