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CURRENT ISSUEMINERVA UROLOGICA E NEFROLOGICA

A Journal on Nephrology and Urology

Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,536

Frequency: Bi-Monthly

ISSN 0393-2249

Online ISSN 1827-1758

 

Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica 2012 March;64(1):63-72

NEPHROLOGY 2012 

Pathogenesis and management of renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephropathy

Yerram P. 1, Karuparthi P. R. 2, Chaudhary K. 1, 3

1 Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA;
2 Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA;
3 Harry S. Truman Veteran’s Hospital, Columbia, MO, USA

Renovascular disease is an important cause of secondary hypertension and renal impairment. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) is the most important cause of renal artery stenosis (RAS), and has been linked to increased cardiovascular risk. The pathogenesis of renovascular hypertension is complex, but is mainly due to the over-activation of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone system. A major consequence of untreated RAS is ischemic nephropathy, which is due to the sustained reduction in renal perfusion leading to derangement of microvascular function, and eventual development of interstitial fibrosis. Diagnosis of these conditions can be complex, sometimes needing invasive testing. Aggressive medical management is key to preventing progression of disease, as the role of revascularization in the management of ARAS is still not well defined.

language: English


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