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MINERVA UROLOGICA E NEFROLOGICA

A Journal on Nephrology and Urology


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Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica 2007 September;59(3):379-93

Copyright © 2007 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation

Cohen D. J. 1, Sung R. S. 2

1 Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY, USA 2 Division of Transplantation Department of Surgery University of Michigan Medical Center Ann Arbor, MI, USA


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Simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation is the most commonly performed type of pancreas transplant. Recipients with functioning pancreas transplants have normal glycemic control without the need for exogenous insulin, and are free of hypoglycemic events. While pancreas transplantation has a beneficial impact on a number of diabetic complications, and kidney-pancreas transplant prolongs survival compared to remaining on the transplant waiting list, the contribution of the pancreas to survival beyond that achieved by kidney transplant alone is controversial. Candidates generally have type 1 diabetes refractory to intensive insulin therapy; selection criteria are more stringent that for kidney transplant alone. Most pancreas transplants are performed with enteric exocrine drainage and systemic venous drainage, although portal venous drainage is also employed. Complications are more frequent and more severe than for kidney transplant alone, which is a consideration when selecting appropriate candidates. Immunosuppres-sion usually includes induction therapy and triple-drug maintenance therapy, but early outcomes using steroid-free regimens are encouraging. Rejection is difficult to accurately detect noninvasively, but the use of percutaneous biopsy in diagnosis is increasing. Outcomes are generally good; the kidney and pancreas graft survival rates are 92% and 85%, respectively at one year. Patient survival exceeds 85% after five years. Although the benefit of the pancreas transplant on mortality is uncertain, most studies demonstrate a significant improvement in quality of life.

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