Home > Journals > Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica > Past Issues > Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica 1999 June;51(2) > Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica 1999 June;51(2):57-60

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

MINERVA UROLOGICA E NEFROLOGICA

A Journal on Nephrology and Urology


Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,984


eTOC

 

  NEFROLOGY
XV CONGRESS OF THE SOCIETA' ITALIANA DI NEFROLOGIA SEZIONE PIEMONTE-VALLE D'AOSTA
(Verbania, October 4, 1997)


Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica 1999 June;51(2):57-60

Copyright © 2000 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Temporary vascular access for hemodialysis in patients with acute renal failure: protocols used by dialysis centers in Piedmont and the Aosta Valley

Cardelli R., Stramignoni E., D’Amicone M., Manzione A. M., Biselli L., Gurioli L., Priasca G. C., Grott C.

Ospedale Maggiore - Chieri - USL 8 - Chieri (TO), UOA di Nefrologia e Dialisi


PDF  


Background. A retrospective study was performed using a multiple-choice questionnaire in order to analyse the normal procedures and trends regarding the insertion and management of emergency dialysis access in patients with acute renal failure in 23 Centers in Piedment and the Aosta Valley, regions in the north of Italy with about 4.5 million inhabitants.
Methods. The observation period ran from January 1996 to July 1997. A questionnaire with 19 main questions and 90 possible multiple answers sent to 22 Centres for adults and the only pediatric centre in both regions.
Results. An analysis of the results showed that the most frequently used site in these regions is the subclavian vein (37.8%), followed by the internal jugular vein (32%), the femoral site (28.8%) and peritoneal catheter (1.4%); in pediatric patients, 5% used the femoral site, 10% the subclavian vein, 20% the internal jugular vein and 65% the peritoneal catheter. In 4 centres (18.2%), nephrologists do not position any type of access for acute renal failure. In 50% of centers, all doctors insert femoral catheters autonomously.
Conclusions. Some choices, such as the subclavian route, are open to criticism and may perhaps be linked to customary procedures used by anesthetists and intensive care specialists. Some centers only have relative automomy for insertion, and lastly some types of catheters and techniques are not used. The peritoneal catheter has been abandoned by adult centers as an access in acute kidney failure patients.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail