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MINERVA UROLOGICA E NEFROLOGICA

A Journal on Nephrology and Urology


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Minerva Urologica e Nefrologica 1998 December;50(4):225-31

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Simultaneous detection of HPV and other sexually transmitted agents in chronic urethritis

Chiarini F. 1, Pisani S. 1, Gallinelli C. 1, Papi E. 1, Seganti L. 1, Degener A. M. 2, Pierangeli A. 2, Gentile V. 3, Brunori S. 3, Di Silverio F. 3

1 University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Institute of Microbiology; 2 University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Department of Cellular and Developmental Biology; 3 University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Rome, Department of Urology


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Background. Many patho­gens may be re­spon­sible of Non Gonococcal Urethritis (NGU) ­with the pos­sible oc­cur­rence of symp­to­mat­ic and asymp­to­mat­ic ­mixed vi­ral and bac­te­ri­al in­fec­tions. In par­tic­u­lar, gen­i­tal pa­pil­lom­a­vi­rus­es (HPVs) ­have ­been ­searched ­since ­they are ­linked to ­both be­nign and ma­lig­nant le­sions of the pe­nis and ure­thra and the pres­ence of a po­ten­tial ­male car­ried ­state has re­ceived lim­it­ed scru­ti­ny ­while the screen­ing of sex­u­al­ly ac­tive fe­males has re­ceived sub­stan­tial at­ten­tion.
Methods. In ­male pa­tients af­fect­ed by chron­ic NGU, the pres­ence of DNA of Chlamydia tra­chom­a­tis, ­herpes sim­plex vi­rus (HSV) ­type 1 and 2 and hu­man pa­pil­lom­a­vi­rus­es by PCR and the oc­cur­rence of Gram pos­i­tive and Gram neg­a­tive mi­cror­gan­isms, of Mycoplasma hom­i­nis and Ureaplasma urea­lyt­i­cum, by con­ven­tion­al cul­tu­ral meth­ods ­have ­been in­ves­ti­gat­ed.
Results. Results ob­tained in­di­cat­ed a ­high per­cent­age of ­mixed in­fec­tions, up to 36%. Genital HPV DNA was de­tect­ed in 31% of spec­i­mens pos­i­tive for two or ­more ­agents, and HSV DNA was de­tect­ed in 10% of stud­ied pop­u­la­tion.
Conclusions. The con­com­i­tant pres­ence of dif­fer­ent in­fec­tious ­agents ­could deter­mine la­tent, sub-clin­i­cal or chron­ic in­fec­tions ­with pe­ri­od­ic re­ac­ti­va­tion. In par­tic­u­lar re­sults sug­gest ­that HPV and HSV may stim­u­late cy­to­kine pro­duc­tion ­which can up reg­u­late the ex­pres­sion of oth­er in­fec­tious ­agents and may be re­spon­sible for la­tent chla­my­di­al in­fec­tions char­ac­ter­ised by the per­sis­tence of ­this mi­cror­gan­ism in an al­tered ­form, vi­able but in a cul­ture neg­a­tive ­state. Therefore an in­creased aware­ness of ­mixed in­fec­tions is rel­e­vant to de­fine the man­age­ment and treat­ment of chron­ic ure­thri­tis.

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