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CURRENT ISSUEMINERVA PEDIATRICA

A Journal on Pediatrics, Neonatology, Adolescent Medicine,
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Indexed/Abstracted in: CAB, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,532

Frequency: Bi-Monthly

ISSN 0026-4946

Online ISSN 1827-1715

 

Minerva Pediatrica 2016 Sep 06

Prevention of syncytial respiratory virus infection with palivizumab. Descriptive and comparative analysis after 12 years of use

Eduardo NARBONA-LOPEZ 1, Jose UBEROS 1, Ana CHECA-ROS 1, Rocio RODRIGUEZ-BELMONTE 2, Antonio MUÑOZ-HOYOS 1

1 Unit of Clinical Paediatrics, San Cecilio University Hospital, Granada, Spain; 2 Paediatric Specialist, St Mary’s Hospital, Imperial College NHS Trust, QEQM Wing, London, UK

BACKGROUND: The use of Palivizumab has been recommended to prevent Syncytial Respiratory Virus infection in vulnerable children.
METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of hospital admissions for bronchiolitis from 2000 to 2012 in the context of a prevention study with Palivizumab in at-risk newborns.
RESULTS: A total of 952 children (59.5% males) were admitted due to bronchiolitis. Admissions occurred in younger children in the SRV+ cases compared to the SRV- cases (p < 0.001). Additionally, 641 children were treated with Palivizumab at our service. Sixty of these children (9.8%) were admitted due to bronchiolitis and SRV was detected in 22 of them (3.4%). Fifty (7.8%) had underlying diseases, 6 (0.9%) presented with a history of perinatal infection and 20 (3.12%) had been part of a multiple birth. The treated children with some additional risk factor presented a greater risk of admission due to bronchiolitis (OR = 1.99, p = 0.045); however, this was not observed for admissions due to SRV (p = 0.945).
CONCLUSIONS: Children treated with Palivizumab showed a lower rate of SRV infection, despite having more risk factors associated with a higher risk of infection or complications.

language: English


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