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MINERVA PEDIATRICA

A Journal on Pediatrics, Neonatology, Adolescent Medicine,
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Minerva Pediatrica 2010 October;62(5):459-73

language: English

A review of polycystic ovarian syndrome in adolescents

Brewer M. 1, Pawelczak M. 2, Kessler M. 2, Shah B. 2

1 Department of Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA;
2 Department of Pediatrics,, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA


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Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex disorder, involving primarily ovarian hyperandrogenism in females and linked with insulin resistance in the majority of cases. Clinical features are widely variable and include a combination of menstrual irregularities, acne, hirsutism, and alopecia. Although it typically presents around puberty, several risk factors during childhood may help raise a high index of suspicion for the development of PCOS in adolescents. The pathophysiology of PCOS still remains unknown and likely includes a combination of genetic factors, insulin resistance, and environmental factors. A thorough diagnostic work up is required in suspected cases and several management modalities have been suggested. Since various long term complications and comorbidities are associated with PCOS, early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention is warranted in these cases.

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bina.shah@nyumc.org