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MINERVA PEDIATRICA

A Journal on Pediatrics, Neonatology, Adolescent Medicine,
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Minerva Pediatrica 2010 June;62(3):261-5

language: English

Ultrasonographic diagnosis of urinary tract anomalies in neonates: a study among Iranian children

Milani Hosseini S. M. 1, Ataei N. 2, Darabi B. 1, Jannati J. 3, Mehdizadeh M. 3, Sheikhvatan M. 4

1 Department of Neonatology, The Children’s Hospital Medical Center, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences/, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran;
2 Department of Pediatric Nephrology, The Children’s Hospital Medical Center, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences/, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran;
3 Department of Pediatric Radiology, The Children’s Hospital Medical Center, School of Medicine, Medical Sciences/, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran;
4 Medical Sciences, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran


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AIM: The incidence of urinary tract anomalies varies in different population and depends on several factors such as underlying etiologies. The goal of this study was to investigate the incidence of abnormal urinary tract ultrasound findings in children with different etiologies.
METHODS: In a case-series study, 100 neonates who were hospitalized in the Children’s Hospital Medical Center with the different etiologies such as sepsis, icter, seizure, and respiratory distress were included. In all neonates, ultrasound study was performed by using 3.5-7.5 MHz probe and neonates with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection underwent DMSA scan and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG).
RESULTS: The mean age of neonates was 10.15±7.45 days and 56% of patients were male. The most frequent etiologies led to hospitalization were icter (37%), sepsis (35%), and infectious respiratory distress (10%). Abnormal sonographic findings were found in 5% of patients. The frequency of urinary tract anomalies in neonates with sepsis was higher than non-septic group (14.29% versus 0.0%, P=0.008).
CONCLUSION: The incidence of urinary tract anomalies which detected by sonography in our population is higher than other reported studies and has strong relationship with the occurrence of neonatal sepsis.

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