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MINERVA PEDIATRICA

A Journal on Pediatrics, Neonatology, Adolescent Medicine,
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry


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CASE REPORTS  BIPOLAR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS


Minerva Pediatrica 2008 February;60(1):141-4

language: English

A patient with rubella encephalitis and status epilepticus

Gülen F., Çagˇliyan E., Aydinok Y., Özen S., Yildiz B.

Department of Pediatrics Ege University Faculty of Medicine, I·zmir, Turkey


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Rubella is an important childhood disease that was historically widespread but is now very infrequent. It is an acute viral infection ordinarily characterized by mild constitutional symptoms. Complications are relatively uncommon in childhood. Encephalitis similar to that seen with measles occurs in about 1 in 6 000 cases. The severity is highly variable, and there is an overall mortality rate of 20%. Symptoms in survivors usually resolve within 1-3 week without neurologic sequelae. An 8.5-year-old boy presented with rubella encephalitis and status epilepticus. Five days before admission the patient had erythematous maculopapular rash on the face, spreading to the trunk and extremities. On the admission day, he had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure with loss of consciousness. Microscopic and cytologic examinations of cerebrospinal fluid showed nonspecific. Electro-encephalography (EEG) showed diffuse slowing. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that rubella IgM antibody titer was positive in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid. One day later, the patient became conscious with normal physical condition. As a conclusion, it is possible to prevent the complications of rubella infection, especially the congenital rubella syndrome and encephalitis with a rapid and efficient vaccination program.

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