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CURRENT ISSUEMINERVA PEDIATRICA

A Journal on Pediatrics, Neonatology, Adolescent Medicine,
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Indexed/Abstracted in: CAB, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,532

Frequency: Bi-Monthly

ISSN 0026-4946

Online ISSN 1827-1715

 

Minerva Pediatrica 2007 December;59(6):767-73

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

How far are physical education teachers from elementary school prepared to help pupils with diabetes while they are at school?

Tahirovic H., Toromanovic A.

Department of Paediatrics University Clinical Center Tuzla Bosnia and Herzegovina

Aim. The aim of the study is to estimate how far physical education teachers from elementary school understand diabetes and are trained in its management and in the treatment of diabetes emergencies according to their understanding.
Methods. In the study a descriptive research method has been used and a closed type survey for data gathering has been employed. The study included 83 physical education teachers from 83 primary schools. They have been divided into 2 groups: the first consisting of 28 physical education teachers whose schools are attended by at least one child with diabetes type 1, the second consisting of 55 physical education teachers whose schools do not have children with diabetes type 1.
Results. In answer to the question about whether the physical education teachers are able to recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia a larger number of school staff in the first group answered “yes” compared to the second group, while interest in education in comparison to lack of interest was significantly present in both groups. As for the question: “Is glucose or meal allowed in the classroom?”, in the first group there were more positive answers, while in the second group there was no difference in terms of positive and negative answers. As for the question “Is blood glucose testing allowed in the classroom?” there was a difference between the groups: the first group’s answers were significantly positive while the second group’s negative.
Conclusion. The results of our survey show that children with diabetes do not have appropriate diabetes care in school and that school staff want to solve this problem.

language: English


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