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MINERVA ORTOPEDICA E TRAUMATOLOGICA

A Journal on Orthopedics and Traumatology


Official Journal of the Piedmontese-Ligurian-Lombard Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology
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COMPLEX SURGERY:SPECIFIC TECHNIQUES  CURRENT TRENDS IN MODERN HIP SURGERY TRENDS AND REAL INNOVATIONS IN THE 1° IMPLANT


Minerva Ortopedica e Traumatologica 2006 August;57(4):289-92

language: Italian

Fixation and geometry in total hip prosthesis: is compromise necessary or is optimisation possible?

Gualdi A., Masnaghetti P., Borroni G., Spezia M., Romagnoli S.

Centro Ortopedico di Quadrante, Omegna (VB)


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Aim. The aim of this paper is to verify if it is necessary to accept a compromise in prosthetic hip geometry or if it is possible to optimise the implant adapting it to the patient’s physiology modifying the prosthetic neck. The possible consequences of these modifications on the outcome of the implant duringthe first year are also examined.
Methods. The number and type of necks used were checked and the number of dislocations during the first year was verified confronting a series of modular hips with a series of standard hips.
Results. The results showed the surgeons used modular necks in 50% of cases and mainly long necks with varus-valgus and 8° version variations. The comparison of the number of dislocations in the two groups showed that modular hips had fewer dislocations.
Conclusion. The conclusion is drawn that the use of modular hip prothesis helps to better adapt it to the patient’s physiology and reduces the number of dislocations during the first year.

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