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A Journal on Orthopedics and Traumatology


Official Journal of the Piedmontese-Ligurian-Lombard Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology
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ORTHOPEDIC AND TRAUMATOLOGIC SURGERY OF THE HIP  98° CONGRESS OF THE PIEDMONTESE-LIGURIAN-LOMBARD SOCIETY OF ORTHOPEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY (SPLLOT) (Loano, October 19-20, 2001)


Minerva Ortopedica e Traumatologica 2001 June;52(3):141-4

language: Italian

Surgical indications for the treatment of inveterate acetabular fractures

Trono M., Zinghi G.


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Background. In practical surgical experience, not all fractures are lucky enough to be treated immediately, or even in the first few days after injury. The more time passes, the more complicated surgery becomes and the worse are the results. While this applies to any skeletal district, it is particularly true of the acetabular bone, where inveterate fractures are extremely complex to treat. The aim of this study was to define the time limit after which these fractures are regarded as inveterate, the diagnostic process and their relative treatment and results.
Methods. In a series of 517 patients, we treated 44 inveterate fractures (29 M, 15 F) over a period of 16 years.
Results. The results were satisfactory in 65% of cases.
Conclusions. In general, treatment is almost always surgical, particularly in the event of epiphyseal dislocation and major decomposition of fragments. Clearly, the reduction and the results have to be accepted as those of ''rescue'' surgery, but these should enable the successful implant of prosthesis in the future. However, there are cases in which the general and local conditions advise against surgery, opting for non-surgical support therapy.

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