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Minerva Oftalmologica 2017 June;59(2):52-6

DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4903.17.01777-9

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Dry eye disease and metabolic syndrome: an update

Kubra SEREFOGLU CABUK 1 , İlkay CAKİR 2, Derya ALP GULİYEV 3

1 Ophthalmology Clinic, Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey; 2 Department of Endocrinology, Kemerburgaz University, Istanbul, Turkey; 3 Department of Ophthalmology, Toyotasa Emergency Aid Hospital, Sakarya, Turkey


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INTRODUCTION: Dry eye disease (DED) is a common multifactorial disease characterized by unstable tear film causing a variety of symptoms and/or visual impairment, potentially accompanied by ocular surface damage. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components are gaining more importance worldwide as affected population rising and MetS may increase the risk of heart diseases, stroke, diabetes and certain cancers. We aimed to review the literature to determine the relationship between DED and MetS and its components.
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A comprehensive search was made using various databases such as PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science, with English articles only, published until March 2017.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Hypertriglyceridemia, especially in women, hypercholesterolemia, and hyperglycemia were defined to be associated with the DED. The main mechanism of this association was suggested as the meibomian gland dysfunction. High blood pressure was also related with the DED. Not only its components but also metabolic syndrome was related with the DED.
CONCLUSIONS: The clinicians should be aware of increased incidence of DED among MetS patients and screen the susceptible patients, especially women, for DED. On the other hand, patients with primary Sjogren Syndrome were reported to more likely experience MetS components and for that reason, in all patients with DED, the etiology should be investigated and systemic evaluations should be performed for accompanying disorders.


KEY WORDS: Hypertension - Meibomian glands - Physiopathology - Metabolic syndrome X

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Issue published online: June 30, 2017

Cite this article as

Serefoglu Cabuk K, Cakir I, Alp Guliyev D. Dry eye disease and metabolic syndrome: an update. Minerva Oftalmol 2017;59:52-6. DOI: 10.23736/S0026-4903.17.01777-9

Corresponding author e-mail

drqubra@gmail.com