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Minerva Medicolegale 2012 June;132(2):119-25

Copyright © 2012 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Sport rehabilitation in professional and non-professional athletes

Gioda M.

Centro di Medicina Preventiva e dello Sport, Università di Torino, Centro di Ricerca Scientifica, Scuola Italiana di Osteopatia e Terapie Manuali, Torino, Italia


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“Life is motion”, as Wallace Stevens wrote in one of his poems. Life is movement, and movement is recognized as well-being. People should never mistake healthy practices for sport. Although sport can give immense satisfaction for both the practitioner and the viewer, it is also important to remember that a traumatic event can always be waiting around the corner. The athlete requires a good technical and physical training, in order to avoid traumatic events. Despite the efforts of trainers, sports and traumatology will continue to co-exist, thus, implying a correct assessment of the variables involved. The role of rehabilitation is necessary, not only for the injury itself, but more importantly, for the full recover of the athlete in his practice and in his everyday life. Moreover, a good rehabilitation process will also reduce health and social costs. The rehabilitation should always be considered before and after surgery. Recovering after a trauma, could sometimes involve a long period of time as great as the anatomical damage occurred. During this period in which the athlete is undertaking treatment, it is necessary to include all the professionals who can take an active part during the path itself. It could be limitative to only mention the surgeon and the physiotherapist, ignoring the importance of a good trainer and forgetting the instrumental therapies that can stimulate the biological processes of repair, as well as the figures of the osteopathic practitioner, the posturologist and/or sports psychologist. These figures are all part of what could contribute to a successful rehabilitation process. This does not necessarily mean that in the case of an injury an athlete has to consult the whole world; like a child who falls and “peels” his knee and is simply cured by his grandmother with positive outcomes. But the main focus must always be the multidisciplinary approach: this is the only way in which is possible to compare the professional growth, for both the athlete and the science itself.

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