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CURRENT ISSUEMINERVA GINECOLOGICA

A Journal on Obstetrics and Gynecology

Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index

Frequency: Bi-Monthly

ISSN 0026-4784

Online ISSN 1827-1650

 

Minerva Ginecologica 2016 June;68(3):297-312

THE DESTINY OF MYOMAS 

    REVIEWS

Ultrasound diagnosis of uterine myomas

Fabiana D. FASCILLA 1, Paola CRAMAROSSA 1, Rossella CANNONE 1, Claudiana OLIVIERI 1, Antonella VIMERCATI 1, Caterina EXACOUSTOS 2

1 II Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, University “Aldo Moro”, Bari, Italy; 2 Department of Biomedicine and Prevention Obstetrics and Gynecological Clinic, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy

Myomas represent a large part of benign gynecological pathology, widely spread in fertile female population. First step to diagnose fibroids is ultrasound (US) that can be 2-dimensional (2D), 3-dimensional (3D), Color Doppler (CD) and sonohysterography (SHG). This review develops according to MUSA’s sonographic features (Morphological Uterus Sonographic Assessment). One of the main topic of interest for ultrasonographer today is endo/myometrial junctional zone (JZ), because it may be useful to discern a diagnosis of myoma and adenomyosis. Another important aspect of ultrasound is the analysis of vascularization in front of a uterine lesion. Indeed, vascular pattern can be used to make differential diagnosis between myoma-adenomyosis and leiomyosarcomas. Myomas should be described accurately according to sonographic guidelines. Sonographic features correlated with symptoms should guide an appropriate surgical or medical treatment.

language: English


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