Home > Journals > Minerva Ginecologica > Past Issues > Minerva Ginecologica 2002 April;54(2) > Minerva Ginecologica 2002 April;54(2):171-8

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

MINERVA GINECOLOGICA

A Journal on Obstetrics and Gynecology


Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  


Minerva Ginecologica 2002 April;54(2):171-8

Copyright © 2002 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: Italian

Anxiety and acceptance of gynecological laparoscopic operations

Cosentino M., Vidotto G., Ponchia R., Trovò S., Magistris M.


PDF  


Background. To evaluate the acceptance of gynecological laparoscopic operations.
Methods. A comparative analysis has been performed in a group of 32 women by analyzing a) the cognitive component, by means of 2 questionnaires administered before and after the operation and b) the emotional component, by evaluating the pre- and post-operative anxiety levels (State anxiety) and the constitutional ones (Trait anxiety) using the STAI Y test. The anxiety level of our group has been compared with that attributed to the general population by means of the Z test. Moreover, significant correlations have been searched between: 1) pre- and postoperative Trait and State anxiety, through the Pearson's correlation test; 2) the variables investigated by the two informational questionnaires and the anxiety measures, through the Student ''t'' test; 3) the informative variables themselves through the chi square test.
Results. Postoperative State anxiety is lower than that of the general population (p<0.05); a significant correlation exists between post- operative State and Trait anxiety (p<0.05); Trait anxiety is higher when fantasies linked to the operation are characterized by fear (p<0.05), and attribution of the decision to operate to the doctor (p<0.05); post-operative State anxiety is higher when the level of education is low (p<0.05) and the attribution of the decision to operate is to the doctor (p<0.05); a significant correlation exists between fantasies characterized by fear and the experience of postoperative pains, between postoperative pains and attribution of the decision to operate to the doctor (p<0.05) and between fantasies characterized by fear and attribution of the decision to operate to the doctor (p<0.05).
Conclusions. Higher anxiety levels have been detected in the pre-operative phase, in less educated patients and when the decision to operate has been attributed to the doctor. A not wholly convinced personal attitude has been accompanied by preoperative fantasies characterized by fear and has resulted in subjectively more painful postoperative course.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail