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Minerva Ginecologica 2000 July-August;52(7-8):275-82

language: Italian

Ovarian drilling in minilaparoscopy under local anesthesia in the surgical treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome

Pellicano M., Zullo A. C., Tommaselli G. A., Nola B., Cappiello F., Criscuolo A., Nappi C.


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Background. To evaluate the feasibility of ovarian drilling using minilaparoscopy under local anesthesia and to determine its efficacy in the surgical treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome.
Methods. Prospective randomized study carried out in an out patient service on 62 women affected by PCOS divided into two groups: 32 patients (group A) underwent bilateral ovarian drilling by minilaparoscopy under local anesthesia and 30 patients (group B) underwent bilateral ovarian drilling by traditional laparoscopy under general anesthesia.
Results. Operation times were not different between the two groups. Discharge time was significantly lower in group A in comparison to group B. The rate of patients discharged after 2 hours was significantly higher in group A. The need for additional analgesia was lower in group A in comparison to group B. Serum LH, A and T levels were significantly reduced after surgery in both groups. Pregnancy rate after 1-year follow-up was higher, although not significantly in group A. Ovulation and abortion rates were not different between the two groups.
Conclusions. Ovarian drilling in minilaparoscopy under local anesthesia is a new option for gynecologists, allowing similar therapeutical results to those achieved by traditional laparoscopy, but with the benefits of a less invasive technique that can be carried out in an outpatient service without the need for general anesthesia.

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