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CURRENT ISSUEMINERVA ENDOCRINOLOGICA

A Journal on Endocrine System Diseases

Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,118

Frequency: Quarterly

ISSN 0391-1977

Online ISSN 1827-1634

 

Minerva Endocrinologica 2014 June;39(2):107-17

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Body fat distribution by anthropometric and MRI-based techniques in relation to insulin secretion and action in men with diabetes

Katergari S. A. 1, Milousis A. 1, Mantatzis M. 2, Gioka T. 3, Tripsianis G. 4, Passadakis P. 5, Prassopoulos P. 2, Papachristou D. N. 1

1 Division of Endocrinology, Democritus University of Thrace, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Alexandroupolis, Greece;
2 Department of Medicine and Radiology, Democritus University of Thrace, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Alexandroupolis, Greece;
3 Labs of Biochemistry, Democritus University of Thrace, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Alexandroupolis, Greece;
4 Medical Statistics, Democritus University of Thrace, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Alexandroupolis, Greece;
5 Division of Nephrology, Democritus University of Thrace, University Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Alexandroupolis, Greece

AIM: Differences in fat accumulation and distribution might be responsible for the greater insulin resistance (IR) in type 2 diabetes. The study aims at examining the relationship between fat accumulation and distribution, and insulin secretion and action, by multilevel methodological approach.
METHODS: Thirty-three diabetic men (D), and 28 sex, age and BMI-matched controls (C) were studied for glucose and insulin during OGTT, insulin resistance and sensitivity, employing HOMA and Matsuda index respectively, and, fat accumulation and distribution by anthropometrics, Bioimpendance Analysis (BIA), and multiple slices MRI of abdomen and hip.
RESULTS: D exhibited higher HOMA compared to C (P<0.001), and lower Matsuda index (P=0.062). No differences in fat distribution by anthropometric or MRI measurements were observed; however, fat accumulation by BIA was higher in D (P=0.035). HOMA correlated to basal, AUC, and peak insulin in both groups (all P<0.001); with weight (r=0.415, P=0.031), hip circumference (HC) (r=0.482, P=0.011), %fat (r=0.400, P<0.05) in C; and with weight, BMI, total and %fat, and waist and HC when all subjects were considered as a group. Matsuda inversely correlated with basal, AUC, and peak insulin (all P<0.001), and HC (r=-0.406, P=0.032) in C. HOMA strongest correlated with L3-L4 subcutaneous (r=0.551, P=0.003) in C, and with L3-L4 visceral (r=0.456, P=0.022) in D.
CONCLUSION: The greater IR in diabetic patients may not be interpreted by differences in fat distribution. IR correlates with different fat compartments in healthy and diabetic subjects of comparable fat distribution, suggesting differences in fat function.

language: English


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