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A Journal on Surgery

Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,877

Frequency: Bi-Monthly

ISSN 0026-4733

Online ISSN 1827-1626


Minerva Chirurgica 2005 December;60(6):481-6


Endoluminal radiofrequency ablation of the great saphenous vein versus stripping. A preliminary study

Colli R., Modugno P., Revelli L., Alberti V., Flore R., Santoliquido A., Tondi P.

Aim. To compare the postoperative courses of patients subjected to closure procedure or stripping of the great saphenous vein (GSV).
Methods. We examined 2 groups of 15 patients with ostial and truncular saphenous insufficiency matched for CEAP clinical and anatomic classes. Group A patients underwent saphenous closure; short stripping was performed on those of Group B. In the Group A surgery was performed under spinal (12) or local (3) anesthesia; the procedure was preceded by crossotomy(5), crossectomy(1) or saphenous ligation (8); in 11 cases microphlebectomies were associated. In the Group B surgery was performed under general (5), spinal (7) or local (3) anesthesia; the procedure always was preceded by crossectomy(1); in 11 cases microphlebectomies were associated.
Results. Group A patients were discharged 6-18 hours after surgery. None presented ecchymosis, hyperemia or skin lesions. Five complained of mild aching thigh pain, which did not require pain medication. All resumed normal daily activities the day after surgery and returned to work after 4.9 days. Six months after surgery, none of the patients had evidence of saphenous vein rechanneling. Group B patients were discharged 12-18 hours after surgery. Nine had ecchymosis on the thigh. Five reported mild thigh pain requiring analgesics. Normal daily activities and work were resumed 2.7 and 9.3 days after surgery.
Conclusions. This retrospective study seems to confirm that endoluminal radiofrequency ablation of the GSV provides good immediate results with no significant complications and can reduce postoperative pain and the length of convalescence with respect to those of stripping.

language: Italian


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