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MINERVA CARDIOANGIOLOGICA

A Journal on Heart and Vascular Diseases


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Angiology and Vascular Pathology
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Minerva Cardioangiologica 2008 August;56(4):391-9

language: English

Use of Impella Recover 2.5 left ventricular assist device in patients with cardiogenic shock or undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention procedures: experience of a high-volume center

Vecchio S., Chechi T., Giuliani G., Lilli A., Consoli L., Spaziani G., Giannotti F., Margheri M.

Unit of Cardiology and Invasive Cardiology 2, Careggi Hospital, Florence, Italy


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Aim. Percutaneous coronary interventions are increasingly applied to high-risk patients. The availability of hemodynamic support devices offers a promising option to prevent and treat low-output syndrome in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of the Impella Recover“ LP 2.5 left ventricular assist device in patients with cardiogenic shock or undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary interventions.
Methods. Eleven patients presenting cardiogenic shock (N=6) or scheduled for high-risk percutaneous revascularization (N=5) were evaluated. The Impella pump was successfully implanted in all patients, except one. When implanted, the device was correctly positioned in the left ventricle and remained in a stable position.
Results. Bleedings occurred in 7 patients (5 of them presented cardiogenic shock), while renal failure and severe thrombocytopenia were observed in 4 and 1 patients respectively, all with cardiogenic shock. During high-risk procedures, the Impella pump succeeded in obtaining hemodynamic stability, while in only two patients with cardiogenic shock the device determined a significant improvement of hemodynamic variables. All elective patients and two patients with cardiogenic shock were discharged from the hospital and were still alive at 30-day follow-up.
Conclusion. These data, although preliminary due to the limited sample size, demonstrated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of the Impella Recover® LP 2.5 during high-risk percutaneous procedures, even though the benefits of prophylactic deployment of such a system have to be further investigated. The use of Impella Recover® LP 2.5 in patients with cardiogenic shock is feasible and safe, however it maybe insufficient in reversing an advanced cardiogenic shock which, probably, has to be treated with more powerful left ventricular assist devices

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