Home > Journals > Minerva Biotecnologica > Past Issues > Minerva Biotecnologica 2002 June;14(2) > Minerva Biotecnologica 2002 June;14(2):171-6

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

MINERVA BIOTECNOLOGICA

A Journal on Biotechnology and Molecular Biology


Indexed/Abstracted in: EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,246


eTOC

 

REVIEWS  7th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON TRANSGLUTAMINASES AND PROTEIN CROSSLINKING REACTIONS
Ferrara (Italy), September 14-17, 2002


Minerva Biotecnologica 2002 June;14(2):171-6

language: English

Tis­sue trans­glu­tam­i­nase in neu­ro­de­gen­er­a­tive dis­eas­es

Johnson G. V. W., Bailey C. D., Tucholski J., Lesort M.

Depart­ment of Psy­chi­a­try, Uni­ver­sity of Ala­bama at Birm­ing­ham ­School of Med­i­cine, Birm­ing­ham, AL, USA


FULL TEXT  


Tis­sue trans­glu­tam­i­nase (tTG), a mul­ti­func­tion­al pro­tein, is the ­most abun­dant trans­glu­tam­i­nase in ­human ­brain, and like­ly to ­play a ­role in reg­u­lat­ing neu­ro­nal func­tion. Tis­sue TG post-­tran­sla­tion­al­ly mod­i­fies pro­teins by trans­am­i­da­tion of spe­cif­ic glu­ta­mine res­i­dues. ­This ­action ­results in the incor­po­ra­tion of poly­amines ­into sub­strate pro­teins or the for­ma­tion of pro­tein cross­links, mod­ifi­ca­tions ­that like­ly ­have sig­nif­i­cant ­effects on neu­ro­nal func­tion. Tis­sue TG is a ­unique mem­ber of the trans­glu­tam­i­nase fam­i­ly as in addi­tion to cat­a­lyz­ing the cal­cium-depen­dent trans­am­i­da­tion reac­tion, it ­also ­binds and hydro­lyz­es GTP and may ­play a ­role in sig­nal trans­duc­tion. Fur­ther, bind­ing of gua­nine nucle­o­tides inhib­its the trans­am­i­dat­ing activ­ity of tTG. Sev­er­al ­roles for tTG in neu­ro­nal func­tion ­have ­been pos­tu­lat­ed, and ­there is evi­dence ­that tTG may ­also ­play a ­role in apop­to­sis. ­Recent find­ings ­have pro­vid­ed evi­dence ­that dys­reg­u­la­tion of tTG may con­trib­ute to the path­o­gen­e­sis of ­Alzheimer’s dis­ease and ­Huntington’s dis­ease, and per­haps oth­er neu­ro­de­gen­er­a­tive con­di­tions. In ­both ­Alzheimer’s and ­Huntington’s dis­ease tTG and TG activ­ity are ele­vat­ed com­pared to age-­matched con­trols. Fur­ther, immu­no­his­to­chem­i­cal stud­ies ­have dem­on­strat­ed ­that ­there is an ­increase in tTG reac­tiv­ity in affect­ed neu­rons in ­both ­Alzheimer’s and ­Hunting-ton’s dis­ease ­brain. ­Although intri­guing, ­many ques­tions ­remain to be ­addressed to defin­i­tive­ly estab­lish a ­role for tTG in ­these neu­ro­de­gen­er­a­tive dis­eas­es.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail