Home > Journals > Minerva Anestesiologica > Past Issues > Minerva Anestesiologica 2013 March;79(3) > Minerva Anestesiologica 2013 March;79(3):227-31

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

MINERVA ANESTESIOLOGICA

A Journal on Anesthesiology, Resuscitation, Analgesia and Intensive Care


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Anesthesiology, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,623


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  FREEfree


Minerva Anestesiologica 2013 March;79(3):227-31

Copyright © 2013 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Mallampati class does not affect the success rate of intubation through an intubating laryngeal mask airway with reverse tracheal tube direction

Ye L. 1, Wong D. T. 2, Liu J. 1, Zhu T. 1

1 Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, People’s Republic of China; 2 Department of Anesthesiology, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada


FULL TEXT  


Background: The aim of this paper was to assess whether the Mallampati class can affect the success rate of intubation through an intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) with a reverse conventional tracheal tube direction.
Methods: Two-hundred ASA I-II adults, 100 patients with Mallampati class 1 or 2 (MP12) and 100 with Mallampati class 3 or 4 (MP34) undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled. All the patients were intubated through the ILMA with a reverse conventional tracheal tube direction. Tracheal intubation was considered successful if proper tracheal positioning was attained within three attempts. Chi-Square analysis was used to compare categorical variables between the two groups.
Results: Tracheal intubation was successful in 186 of 200 patients (93.0%): 169 (84.5%) at the first attempt. Fourteen (7.0%) had to be intubated using direct laryngoscope. Both the first attempt success rate and overall success rate were similar between the MP12 and MP34 groups (84.0 vs. 85.0%, P=0.845 and 93.0 vs. 93.0%, respectively).
Conclusion: Tracheal intubation was successful in 93.0% of patients through an ILMA with a reverse conventional tracheal tube. Mallampati class did not affect the success rate of intubation.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail

xwtao.zhu@gmail.com