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A Journal on Anesthesiology, Resuscitation, Analgesia and Intensive Care

Official Journal of the Italian Society of Anesthesiology, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,036

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0375-9393

Online ISSN 1827-1596


Minerva Anestesiologica 2009 May;75(5):333-37


Dopamine versus norepinephrine: is one better?

Vincent J.-L. 1, Biston P. 2, Devriendt J. 3, Brasseur A. 1, De Backer D. 1

1 Department of Intensive Care, Erasme Hospital;
2 CHU Charleroi, Brussels, Belgium;
3 Brugmann Hospital, Université libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

Dopamine and norepinephrine are widely used as first line agents to correct hypotension in patients with acute circulatory failure. There has been considerable debate in recent years as to whether one is better than the other. Both drugs can increase blood pressure in shock states, although norepinephrine is more powerful. Dopamine can increase cardiac output more than norepinephrine, and in addition to the increase in global blood flow, has the potential advantage of increasing renal and hepatosplanchnic blood flow. However, dopamine has potentially detrimental effects on the release of pituitary hormones and especially prolactin, although the clinical relevance of these effects is unclear. Observational studies have provided conflicting results regarding the effects of these two drugs on outcomes, and results from a recently completed randomized controlled trial are eagerly waited.

language: English


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