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MINERVA ANESTESIOLOGICA

A Journal on Anesthesiology, Resuscitation, Analgesia and Intensive Care


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Anesthesiology, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care
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SMART SUMMER  SMART 2006 - Milan, May 10-12, 2006


Minerva Anestesiologica 2006 June;72(6):567-76

language: English

Hypercapnia: permissive and therapeutic

Kavanagh B. P. 1,2,3, Laffey J. G. 1,2,3

1 Department of Critical Care Medicine Hospital for Sick Children University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
2 Department of Anesthesia Hospital for Sick Children University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
3 Department of Physiology Hospital for Sick Children University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada


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Hypercapnia has traditionally been avoided in the quest to keep parameters normal. Recent understanding of the role of excessive tidal stretch has prompted clinicians to avoid high tidal volumes or plateau pressures, and the resulting permissive hypercapnia has been increasingly tolerated by clinicians. Newer data point to the potential for elevated CO2 to be protective, and in some experimental situations, to cause harm. The protective effects of so called ‘therapeutic hypercapnia’ remain experimental at present, but promising laboratory studies suggest potential roles for the eventual selective application at the bedside.

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