Home > Journals > Minerva Anestesiologica > Past Issues > Minerva Anestesiologica 2005 July-August;71(7-8) > Minerva Anestesiologica 2005 July-August;71(7-8):419-23

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

MINERVA ANESTESIOLOGICA

A Journal on Anesthesiology, Resuscitation, Analgesia and Intensive Care


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Anesthesiology, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,623


eTOC

 

REVIEWS  III MEETING OF PAIN SECTION OF SIAARTI
INTERNATIONAL J. J. BONICA MEMORIAL
Capo Calavà (Messina), September 20-23, 2004
FREEfree


Minerva Anestesiologica 2005 July-August;71(7-8):419-23

Copyright © 2005 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Applied nanotechnology for the management of breakthrough cancer pain

Sprintz M. 1, Benedetti C. 2, Ferrari M. 3, 4

1 Biomedical Engineering Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA 2 Department of Anesthesiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA 3 National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA 4 Division of Hematology and Oncology and Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA


FULL TEXT  


Pain, often considered the 5th vital sign, plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of cancer. Often addressed as an afterthought, untreated or under-treated cancer-related pain can have deleterious effects on a patient’s physical and psychological well-being. Additionally, patients with breakthrough cancer pain tend to have more intense and more frequent background pain than patients without breakthrough pain. Currently, only oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate (OTFC) has reached the market for the treatment of cancer-related breakthrough pain. OTFC is an excellent first step in addressing the unmet need for symptomatic relief of breakthrough cancer pain; however, there is much room for improvement. Nanoscale science and engineering advancements have the long-term potential to bring revolutionary changes in society and across virtually all physical, biological and engineering disciplines, particularly medicine. Nanotechnology offers the potential to address multiple, major unmet problems in the diagnosis, treatment and symptom management of a large variety of diseases and conditions, including cancer. Nanotechnology can engender transformational progress in crucial aspects of the fight against cancer, spanning the continuum that ranges from prevention, to early detection, screening and monitoring, to innovative diagnostics and therapeutic modalities in the era of patient-centered, molecular medicine. Specifically, the authors will discuss their current research in the field of biomedical nanotechnology and its application to the management of breakthrough cancer pain.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail