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Official Journal of the Italian Society of Anesthesiology, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care
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REVIEWS  III MEETING OF PAIN SECTION OF SIAARTI
INTERNATIONAL J. J. BONICA MEMORIAL
Capo Calavà (Messina), September 20-23, 2004


Minerva Anestesiologica 2005 July-August;71(7-8):405-12

language: English

Cannabinoid pharmacotherapy: past, present and future

Mather L.

University of Sydney at Royal North Shore Hospital St Leonards, Sydney, Australia


FULL TEXT  REPRINTS


Cannabinoids are medically interesting, but the available data are still weak scientifically and overwhelming anecdotally. In the management of pain, cannabinoids have been shown to have antinociceptive properties in animal models of pain, with non-opiate mechanisms appearing to predominate. A widely cited meta-analysis suggested that cannabinoids offer moderate pain relief, similar to codeine, and limited by side effects. Further research, particularly into modes of delivery, to assess their therapeutic potential are needed. Any successful future clinical development of cannabinoid pharmacotherapy depends upon a dosage form that is reliable, rapidly titratable to effect, non-smoked, and preferably parenteral to avoid hepatic first pass metabolism.

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