Home > Journals > Minerva Anestesiologica > Past Issues > Minerva Anestesiologica 2005 January-February;71(1-2) > Minerva Anestesiologica 2005 January-February;71(1-2):21-5

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

MINERVA ANESTESIOLOGICA

A Journal on Anesthesiology, Resuscitation, Analgesia and Intensive Care


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Anesthesiology, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,036


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  ANESTHESIA


Minerva Anestesiologica 2005 January-February;71(1-2):21-5

language: English

Does supplemental perioperative oxygen administration reduce the incidence of wound infection in elective colorectal surgery?

Mayzler O. 1, Weksler N. 2, Domchik S. 1, Klein M. 1, Mizrahi S. 1, Gurman G. M. 2

1 Department of General Surgery A Soroka Medical Center Faculty of Health Sciences Ben Gurion University of the Negev Beer Sheva, Israel
2 Department of Critical Care Medicine Soroka Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences Ben Gurion University of the Negev Beer Sheva, Israel


FULL TEXT  


Aim. An association has been proposed between perioperative administration of 80% oxygen and a lower incidence of wound infection after colorectal surgery. The present study was conducted to assess this hypothesis.
Methods. Thirty-eight patients (ASA classification 1 and 2) undergoing elective colorectal cancer surgery were allocated at random to 2 groups. Group 1 consisted of 19 patients who received an admixture of 80% oxygen and 20% nitrogen during anesthesia through an orotracheal tube and during the 2 first hours in the recovery room through a tight facemask with reservoir. Group 2 consisted of 19 patients who received an admixture of 70% nitrous oxide and 30% oxygen during anesthesia, followed by administration of 30% oxygen delivered by a blender through a tight facemask with reservoir in the same manner than group 1, during the first 2 hours in the recovery room. Wound infection was evaluated daily during hospital stay and after 7 days, 2 weeks, and 1 month.
Results. The incidence of wound infection was 12.5% in group 1 and 17.6% in group 2 (p=0.53).
Conclusion. The results of this study showed no reduction in the incidence of wound infection following elective colorectal surgery in patients receiving 80% oxygen during the perioperative period.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail