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MINERVA ANESTESIOLOGICA

A Journal on Anesthesiology, Resuscitation, Analgesia and Intensive Care


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Anesthesiology, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care
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SUPPORT VENTILATION  SMART 2002 Milan, May 29-31, 2002FREEfree


Minerva Anestesiologica 2002 May;68(5):337-40

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Noninvasive pressure support ventilation

Hess D.

From the Anaesthesia, Harvard Medical School Respiratory Care, Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, MA, USA


FULL TEXT  


In appro­pri­ate­ly select­ed ­patients, ­NPPV decreas­es intu­ba­tion ­rate, ­improves sur­vi­val, and is ­cost-effec­tive. Pres­sure sup­port ven­ti­la­tion is com­mon­ly ­used suc­cess­ful­ly for ­NPPV. An ­issue ­with the use of pres­sure sup­port is the abil­ity of the ven­ti­la­tor to ­detect the end of inha­la­tion in the pres­ence of ­leaks or in ­patients ­with ­severe air­flow obstruc­tion. A con­cern ­with port­able pres­sure ven­ti­la­tors is the poten­tial for rebreath­ing of car­bon diox­ide. ­Despite ­these ­issues, pres­sure sup­port ven­ti­la­tion has ­been ­used suc­cess­ful­ly for non­in­va­sive ven­ti­la­tion in thou­sands of ­patients ­with ­acute res­pir­a­to­ry fail­ure.

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