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A Journal on Sports Medicine

Official Journal of the Italian Sports Medicine Federation
Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,163

Frequency: Quarterly

ISSN 0025-7826

Online ISSN 1827-1863

 

Medicina dello Sport 2015 December;68(4):577-84

    PHYSIOLOGICAL AREA

Influence of physical exercise on serum concentration of magnesium and phosphorus

Maynar-Mariño M. 1, Crespo C. 1, Llerena F. 2, Grijota F. 1, Alves J. 1, Muñoz D. 3, Caballero M. J. 2

1 Department of Physiology, School of Sport Sciences, University of Extremadura, Cáceres, Badajoz, Spain;
2 Department of Medical-Surgical Therapeutics, School of Medicine, University of Extremadura, Cáceres, Badajoz, Spain;
3 Department of Physical Education and Sport, Sport Sciences Faculty, University of Extremadura, Cáceres, Badajoz, Spain

AIM: Physical activity leads to many metabolic changes in the body and therefore regular intense exercise training may increase mineral requirements, either by increasing degradation rates or by decreasing losses from the body. The aim of the present study was to determine changes occurring in the serum concentration of magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P) in sportsmen living in Cáceres, Extremadura (Spain).
METHODS: Eighty Spanish national sportsmen, with different metabolic modalities, were recruited before the start of their training period. All the athletes live in the same geographic area and had performed training regularly for the previous two years with a rigorous training target at high-level competition. Thirty-one sedentary subjects of the same geographic area were enrolled for the control group.
RESULTS: The serum Mg concentrations were lower (P<0.001), although within the normal range, in athletes of all types compared to sedentary subjects. The serum P concentrations were lower (P<0.001) in athletes of all types compared to sedentary subjects. Separating athletes as energy modality found that are aerobic (P<0.05) and aerobic-anaerobic (P<0.001) those with low concentrations in respect the control group, without showing differences anaerobic group.
CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that physical activity produces significant changes in serum concentrations of Mg and P and these changes may be due to the sport that practice.


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