Home > Journals > Medicina dello Sport > Past Issues > Medicina dello Sport 2000 March;53(1) > Medicina dello Sport 2000 March;53(1):69-74

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

MEDICINA DELLO SPORT

A Journal on Sports Medicine


Official Journal of the Italian Sports Medicine Federation
Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 0,202


eTOC

 

PSYCHIATRIC AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SECTION  


Medicina dello Sport 2000 March;53(1):69-74

Copyright © 2000 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Depressiveness, anxiety, perceived stress and self-efficacy in middle-aged men with different engagement in physical activity

Eensoo D. 1, Harro J. 2, Harro M. 1, Rimm H. 2, Viru A. M. 3

1 Department of Public Health, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia; 2 Department of Psychology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia; 3 Department of Sports Biology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia


PDF  


It is established that good mental health is positively associated with physical activity. How much physical activity would be needed and which type of activities are most beneficial is not yet clear. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the association between last year leisure-time moderate to vigorous physical activity, and involvement in high intensity training during the last 3 months with, depressiveness, state and trait anxiety, perceived stress, and perceived self-efficacy.
Regular intensive sport training during the last three months, and the leisuretime physical activity during the last year was assessed by means of self-report questionnaires in 81 middle-aged (mean age 40 years) healthy men. Psychometric measurements were carried out by using the approbated Estonian versions of Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Form, Perceived Stress Scale, and Self-Efficacy Scale.
One third of the subjects had no leisure-time moderate to vigorous physical activity during the last year. Division of remaining sample by median physical activity (2.1 h/wk) revealed that the physically most active group was significantly less depressive, stressed and anxious, and they had significantly higher scores of selfefficacy than the more sedentary men. In this sample 25% of the subjects were involved in regular intensive sport training during the last three months. The "involvement" group in regular intensive physical activity over last three months did not differ from the "no involvement" group with regard to any psychological measures.
These results show that previous year leisure-time moderate to vigorous physical activity has a beneficial effect on mental health in middle-aged men.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail