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INTERNATIONAL ANGIOLOGY

A Journal on Angiology


Official Journal of the International Union of Angiology, the International Union of Phlebology and the Central European Vascular Forum
Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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International Angiology 2017 Mar 14

DOI: 10.23736/S0392-9590.17.03824-X

Copyright © 2017 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Mitochondrial dysfunction in calf muscles of patients with combined peripheral arterial disease and diabetes type 2

Brian LINDEGAARD PEDERSEN 1, Niels BÆKGAARD 1, Bjørn QUISTORFF 2

1 Department of Vascular Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Gentofte Hospital, Gentofte, Denmark; 2 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark


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BACKGROUND: This study elucidate the effects on muscle mitochondrial function in patients suffering from combined peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the relation to patient symptoms and treatment.
METHODS: Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS) calf muscle exercise tests were conducted on Forty subjects, 15 (PAD), 15 (PAD+T2D) and 10 healthy age matched controls (CTRL) recruited from the vascular outpatient clinic at Gentofte County Hospital, Denmark. Calf muscle biopsies (~ 80 mg) (Gastrocnemius and Anterior tibial muscles) were sampled and mitochondrial function tested applying high resolution oxygraphy on isolated muscle fibers.
RESULTS: The NIRS exercise tests showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in the PAD+T2D group by a longer recovery of the deoxygenation resulting from exercise in spite of a higher exercise oxygenation level compared to the PAD group. This was confirmed by a ~30% reduction in oxygen consumption in the muscle biopsy tests for the PAD+T2D compared to the PAD group (P<0.05). We claim that this mitochondrial dysfunction partly explains the ~30% reduction in tread mill walking distance for the PAD+T2D group observed in this study.
CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the use of early surgical revascularization in the PAD+T2D group, in order to obtain better walking performance and probably reduced risk of permanent mitochondrial damage.


KEY WORDS: PAD - T2D - Muscle biopsies - Mitochondrial function - NIRS

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Brian.Lindegaard.Pedersen.01@regionh.dk