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INTERNATIONAL ANGIOLOGY

A Journal on Angiology


Official Journal of the International Union of Angiology, the International Union of Phlebology and the Central European Vascular Forum
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International Angiology 2012 December;31(6):544-9

language: English

Interface pressure is affected by slippage of bandages at thigh

Miyazaki K. 1, Hirai M. 1, Koyama A. 1, Iwata H. 2, Ohashi M. 3, Ota A. 4

1 Department of Vascular Surgery, Tokai Hospital, Nagoya, Japan;
2 The Department of Vascular Surgery, Aichi Medical University Hospital, Nagakute-cho, Japan;
3 Department of Rehabilitation, Midori Hospital, Gifu, Japan; 4Department of Surgery, Midori Hospital, Gifu, Japan


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AIM: Very little is known about how compression bandages lose interface pressure. We hypothesized that the loss of interface pressure is correlated with the slippage of the bandages, and studied the interface pressure and slippage of three bandages over 8 hours.
METHODS: Twenty-Seven legs from 27 healthy volunteers were bandaged with short stretch bandages (SS), cohesive short stretch bandages (CS), and long stretch bandages (LS). Pressure sensors were placed above the ankle (B1), below the knee (D), and mid thigh (F). Interface pressures in a sitting position were recorded at the beginning, and 4 and 8 hours later. In 17 legs, the pressure sensor sites were marked, and their heights were measured on standing upright.
RESULTS: SS and CS lost interface pressure quickly, but LS maintained pressure better than SS and CS at all sites. There was no pressure difference between SS and CS at the lower leg. However, CS maintained pressure better than SS at the mid thigh (44.6% vs. 54.4% pressure loss at 8 hours, respectively. P=0.037). There was a tendency toward less slippage with CS than SS at the mid thigh. In CS and LS, there was a linear correlation between the slippage of bandages and the interface pressure at the mid thigh (P <.01, in both).
CONCLUSION: The interface pressure may be affected by the slippage of bandages at the thigh, but not at the lower leg. Cohesive short stretch bandages may exert their beneficial impact at the thigh.

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