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CURRENT ISSUEGAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

A Journal on Internal Medicine and Pharmacology

Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0393-3660

Online ISSN 1827-1812

 

Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2015 May;174(5):209-24

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

The effect of creatine supplementation with milk combined with resistance training on strength and power in women

Stastny S. N. 1, Christensen B. K. 1, Hilgers Greterman S. 1, Okamatsu H. 1, Manikowske T. L. 2, Youd L. 3, Champa J. 4

1 Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Health, Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, USA;
2 Exercise Science, Sport and Exercise Science, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO, USA;
3 PharmD Professional Program, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA;
4 Nutrition and Training Services, N.E.W., Dickinson, ND, USA

AIM: The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of milk-supplemented resistance training (RT), using a moderate dose creatine (CR) or placebo (PLAC), on strength and power in nonresistance trained women.
METHODS: This study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel design. Fifty-six women were assigned to 1 of 5 groups: CRHI (CR supplemented subjects that were higher than RDA for protein at baseline), PLACHI (placebo subjects that were higher than RDA for protein at baseline), CRLO (CR supplemented subjects that were below RDA for protein at baseline), PLACLO (placebo subjects that were below RDA for protein at baseline), or CONTROL (no treatment). CRHI, PLACHI, CRLO and PLACLO received 8 weeks RT with milk supplement and were given 5-day 17 g·d−1 followed by 0.05 g·kg−1 daily dose of either CR or PLAC. Measurements included body mass, 3-repetition maximum (3RM) squat and bench press, vertical jump (VJ) and medicine ball throw. Composition by skinfold thickness and bioelectrical impedance were measured at weeks 0, 4, and 8, respectively. Reported side effects of CR and PLAC were reported to personal trainers weekly.
RESULTS: Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that squat, bench press, medicine ball throw and VJ, increased in all groups (p<0.05), except CONTROL in VJ. Differences in the squats were as follows: CRHI (35.0±26.5 kg or 73%; p<0.05) and CRLO (38.9±23.8 kg or 82%; p<0.05) compared to PLACHI (34.4±39.8 kg or 73%; p<0.05), PLAC-LO (38.6±21.7 kg or 77%; p<0.05), the lowest gain was in the CONTROL (11.8±36.93 kg or 24%; p<0.05). Squat CR and PLAC gains ranged from 0-147%. Overall gains for bench were 28% CR, 20% PLAC and 8% CONTROL. There were no significant differences between groups in squat or bench. Deltas for power tests were not significantly different.
CONCLUSION: With RT, whether or not subjects met/exceeded or did not meet the RDA for protein, the moderate dose of CR with milk had no significant group impact on select measures of strength and power results in women, but individual differences were noted.

language: English


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