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GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

A Journal on Internal Medicine and Pharmacology


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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2015 March;174(3):93-103

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Hormonal, lactate, and subjective responses to various resistance training protocols

Vincent W. 1, Berg K. 1, Buresh R. 2, Latin R. 1, French J. 3, Meendering J. 4

1 School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA;
2 Department of Exercise Science and Sport Management, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, USA;
3 Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA
4 Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA


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AIM: Aim of the study was to quantify and compare the influence of variations in load and recovery during resistance training (RT) on human growth hormone (hGH), testosterone (TEST), and lactate (LA) responses, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE).
METHODS: fasting blood samples were collected from eight resistance-trained men at rest and assessed for hGH, TEST, and LA. Participants then performed four RT sessions in random order: 1) 10 repetition-maximum (RM)/1-min recovery; 2) 10 RM/ 3-min recovery; 3) 5 RM/ 1-min recovery, and 4) 5 RM/ 3-min recovery. Blood samples were collected after each session and also assessed for hGH, TEST, and LA. RPE was also recorded after each session.
RESULTS: There was a main effect for load, but not for recovery, on hGH, TEST, LA, and RPE responses. Effect-size analysis revealed that training load explains more of the variability in hormonal, LA, and RPE response to RT than recovery period.
CONCLUSION: in trained men, training protocols employing a moderate load and short rest periods elicit a greater post-exercise hGH and LA response, and a higher session RPE, than protocols using heavier loads and longer interset rest periods, and training load exerts a greater influence on hormonal and LA responses than recovery period.

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