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GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

A Journal on Internal Medicine and Pharmacology


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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2013 March;172(3):179-84

language: English

Differences between maximum and submaximum pinch strengths in dominant and non-dominant hands

Kitabayashi T. 1, Demura S.-I. 2, Aoki H. 3

1 Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo, Japan;
2 Kanazawa University, Tokyo, Japan;
3 Kanazawa College of Art, Tokyo, Japan


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Aim: This study aimed to examine the difference between the pinch strengths of the thumb and each finger in the dominant and non-dominant hands.
Methods: The subjects were 30 healthy young adult males (mean age 18.5 ± 2.6 yr, mean height 174.2 ±6.5 cm, mean weight 68.0 ± 7.9 kg) with right hand dominance. The adjusted pinch strength was measured for each subject’s thumb and other fingers. The adjusted pinch strength was measured when subjects exerted 50% of the maximum pinch strength. The difference between the demand value and the real exertion value was used as a parameter.
Results: Significant differences between the dominant and non-dominant hands were found between thumb-index fingers and thumb-middle fingers, and the dominant hand was 18% greater. The pinch strength was larger in the order of index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger. All correlations between pinch strengths in both hands were significant and the values of middle and ring fingers (r=0.95 and 0.89) were very large. A difference of adjusted pinch strength was larger in the order of thumb, forefinger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger, and it tended to be larger in the non-dominant hand. This difference was particularly marked between the right and left thumb and forefinger.
Conclusion: The maximal pinch strength and adjusted pinch strength in fingers more frequently used in daily life are superior in the dominant hand and this difference is marked, but the relationship between both hands is low.

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