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GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2012 June;171(3):313-22

language: English

Effects of plyometric training and creatine monohydrate supplementation on anaerobic capacity and muscle damage

Lin Y.-Y. 1, Lin J.-S. 2, Lin Y.-F. 2, Fang C.-L. 1, Lin H.-C. 2

1 Department of Physical Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei City, Taiwan;
2 Department of Physical Education, National Pingtun University of Education, Pingtung County, Taiwan


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Aim. This study investigated the effects of plyometric training and creatine monohydrate supplementation on anaerobic capacity and muscle damage, twenty six college-age male students participated in this study.
Methods. The participants were randomly assigned into three groups: i) plyometric training with maltodextrin supplementation group (PT, N.=9); ii) plyometric training with creatine supplementation group (PT+ Cr, N.=9); or iii) control group (CON, N.=8). PT and PT+ Cr groups accepted plyometric training program 3 d/wk and consumed their supplementation 3 d/wk (20g/d). CON group maintained their lifestyle without training. Anaerobic capacity (30 m sprint, standing long jump, and 30-s Wingate anaerobic test) and muscle damage (CK, LDH, and neutrophils) were examined in pre- and post-test. Separate two factors (group (3) x time (2)) ANOVA with repeated measures on group and time were computed for before and after training.
Results. For 30 m sprint and standing long jump, the results indicated that PT and PT+ Cr groups increased significantly (P<0.05). Besides, the anaerobic capacity (AnC) and mean anaerobic power (M-AnP) of 30-s Wingate anaerobic test were significantly increased (P<0.05) in PT and PT+ Cr groups. However, there were no significant (P>0.05) changes among three groups in the variables of muscle damage (CK, LDH and neutrophils).
Conclusion. Plyometric training can improve the anaerobic capacity (30 m sprint, standing long jump, anaerobic capacity (AnC) and mean anaerobic power (M-AnP)), but may cause little damage in muscle. However, plyometric training with creatine supplementation could not increase anaerobic capacity additionally.

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