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GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

A Journal on Internal Medicine and Pharmacology


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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2012 April;171(2):135-41

language: English

Gender and the laterality of various coordination tests

Kawabata H. 1, Demura S. 1, Kitabayashi T. 2, Shin S. 3, Sato S. 4

1 Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa Univercity, Kanazawa, Japan;
2 Tokyo University of Science, Yokonama, Japan;
3 Kanazawa University Center for Innovation Kanazawa, Japan;
4 Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Kanazawa, Japan


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Aim. This study aimed to examine gender and the laterality of various coordination tests. Methods. The subjects were 20 male and 20 female adults without previous wrist injuries or nerve damage of the upper limbs. Subjects performed three trials of each coordination test (the Moving Beans with Tweezers test and the Purdue Pegboard test) and seven trials each of the pursuit rotor test with the dominant and non-dominant hand. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s honest significant difference (HSD) multiple-comparison method were used to examine hand and gender differences.
Results. The dominant hand was superior in all tests to the non-dominant hand. Particularly, marked laterality of the Moving Beans with Tweezers test and the Purdue Pegboard test was confirmed. A significant gender difference was found in the coordinated strength exertion test and the pursuit rotor test.
Conclusion. Although laterality is found in all coordination tests, it is marked in the Moving Beans and Purdue Pegboard tests which require quick and skillful use of the hands and fingers. A gender difference was found in the coordinated strength exertion test and the pursuit rotor test which require both muscle strength and coordination of eyes, arm and hand.

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