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GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

A Journal on Internal Medicine and Pharmacology


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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2012 April;171(2):103-8

Copyright © 2012 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Laterality and differences in controlled force exertion among competitive sports athletes

Kubota H. 1, Demura S. 2

1 Faculty of Education, Gifu University, Yanagido1-1, Gifu, Japan; 2 Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan


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Aim. The purpose of this study was to examine laterality and differences in controlled force exertion among competitive sports athletes including judo competitors, who regularly exert grip strength in judo practice and competition.
Methods. The subjects were 75 right-handed males which consisted of 20 judo competitors (age 19.8±1.6 yrs), 20 football players (age 19.7±1.2 yrs), 20 track and field athletes (age 19.8±1.6 yrs), and 15 non-athletes (age 20.1±2.2 yrs). The maximal grip strength was measured twice with a 1-min interval, and the greater value was used in this study. The subjects performed the controlled force exertion test 3 times after one practice trial (one trial was 40 sec.). They matched their grip strengths to the demand values changing at a constant frequency (range=5 to 25% of maximal grip strength). The total of the differences between the demand value and grip exertion value was calculated and a mean of 2 close values among 3 trials was used as a representative value.
Results. Controlled force exertion showed significant laterality in all groups, but there was not a significant difference among groups.
Conclusion. In conclusion, sports experience may have little effect on controlled force exertion and laterality of controlled force exertion.

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