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GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2010 October;169(5):181-91

language: English

Lower limb laterality characteristics based on the relationship between activities and individual laterality

Demura S., Sato S., Sugiura H.

1 Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
2 Life-long Sports, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Kanazawa, Japan
3 Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University,, Kanazawa, Japan


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Aim. This study aimed to determine the relationship between leg preference and footedness based on the relationship between activities and individual laterality.
Methods. There were 2 549 subjects (1 561 males and 988 females) aged from 14 to 29 years. The legs used for each lower limb activity (preferred leg) were assessed with four stabilization activities and four mobilization activities. The laterality quotient (LQ) and Lambda (λ) coefficients were calculated for laterality indexes of each individual and activity, respectively, and footedness was determined to be right-footed (LQ > 0), both-footed (LQ = 0) or left-footed (LQ < 0). Discriminant analysis using the preferred leg for each activity as the independent variable and footedness as a dependent variable was conducted to examine the contribution of the preferred leg in each activity on the determination of footedness, and to determine an activity combination which can distinguish footedness with high accuracy.
Results. The percentage of non-right-footed males was two or three times greater than that of females. The rate of correctly distinguishing left-footed subjects was greater in the mobilization activities than in the stabilization activities, and this trend was found regardless of sex or exercise experience. Hopping on one foot, stepping up on a chair, kicking a ball and stamping on an object could correctly distinguish right-footed and left-footed subjects with higher accuracy at the rate of 97.1% and 67.3%, respectively, compared to the other activities.
Conclusion. This lower limb activity combination can determine footedness with high accuracy.

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