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GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

A Journal on Internal Medicine and Pharmacology


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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2008 December;167(6):293-8

language: English

Examining a 30-minute walking program using a pedometer in the management of type 2 diabetes

Mitsui T. 1, Shimaoka K. 2, Kobayashi T. 3

1 Laboratory of Nutritional Physiology School of Food and Nutritional Sciences University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka, Japan
2 Research Center of Health Physical Fitness and Sports, Nagoya University Furocho, Chikusaku, Nagoya, Japan
3 Kusanagi Internal and Pediatric Clinic, Shizuoka, Japan


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Aim. To date, walking assessed by use of a pedometer and setting a goal of 10 000 steps/day have gained popularity. On the other hand, the efficacy of 30-minute daily walking on the management of type 2 diabetes has not been reported.
Methods. Eleven sedentary adults with type 2 diabetes (3 men, 8 women, 64.4±7.7 years) carried out the program with a goal of at least 30 minutes of walking, 5 days/week, for 12 weeks and to record their walking time and steps/day. The control group consisted of 10 diabetes patients (2 men, 8 women, 61.8±8.3 years). The physical characteristics and blood constituents were measured before and after the program.
Results. The number of steps of the walking group increased to 7 700-8 700 steps/day, from 4 613±1 413, during the period. Although 6 walking group participants showed improvement in glycemic control, i.e., a reduction in blood glucose, HbA1c, and insulin resistance, the changes of BMI, blood pressure, glycemic control, and lipoproteins were not significant within either group. Compared with the control group, the change of HbA1c was significant in the walking group (P=0.026).
Conclusion. Our result suggests that a goal of 10000 steps/day is tentative, and a 30-minute daily walking may be potential and practical in the management of type 2 diabetes if it is combined with diet.

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