Home > Journals > Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche > Past Issues > Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2008 August;167(4) > Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2008 August;167(4):147-52

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

A Journal on Internal Medicine and Pharmacology


Indexed/Abstracted in: BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  


Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2008 August;167(4):147-52

language: English

Comparison of Nutritional Intake between Volleyball and Basketball Women Athletes of the Olympic National Teams

Papadopoulou S. D. 1, Papadopoulou S. K. 2,Vamva-koudis E. 1, Tsitskaris G. 1

1 Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Greece
2 Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Technological Educational Institution of Thessaloniki, Greece


PDF  


Aim. The purpose of this study was to record nutritional intake of elite athletes-members of the Greek Women’s Olympic National Volleyball and Basketball Teams and identify differences in nutritional intake between the two sports.
Methods. Fourteen volleyball (VB) and sixteen basketball (BB) athletes, of mean age 25.50±3.16 years and 27.31±3.38 years respectively, participated in the study. The food intake analysis was accomplished using the “Food Processor” nutrition program.
Results. Female VB athletes had significantly lower energy intake than female BB athletes, 1167±130Kcal and 1344±250Kcal respectively (p<.0.05). Regarding macronutrient intake, VB athletes consumed 1.89±0.48g cho/Kg BW, which was significantly less compared to BB athletes who presented a value of 2.51±0.86g cho/Kg BW (p<.0.05). There was no significant difference between VB and BB athletes in protein (0.87±0.19 g/Kg BW and 0.83±0.17 g/Kg BW respectively) or fat intake (31.94±5.87% EI and 31.25±7.27% EI respectively) (p>0.05). With regard to micronutrient intake, BB athletes showed significantly higher intake concerning vitamins A, B1, B2, C, folic and pantothenic acid (p<0.05). The mean intake values of VB athletes did not meet the RDA recommended values for vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, B12, C, D, E, biotin, folic and pantothenic acid, and the minerals Ca, Fe, Mn, Se and Zn. As for BB athletes, they did not meet the RDA values regarding vitamins D, E, biotin, folic and pantothenic acid, and the minerals Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn and Se.
Conclusion. In conclusion, both Olympic Na-tional Women’s Teams had energy and nutrient intake that prohibited them from maintaining a maximum athletic performance.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail