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GAZZETTA MEDICA ITALIANA ARCHIVIO PER LE SCIENZE MEDICHE

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Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche 2007 June;166(3):97-103

Copyright © 2007 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

Functional results and quality-of-life after hysterectomy in Turkish women

Moraloglu O., Tapisiz O. L., Moroy P., Gungor T., Bulgurlu H., Doganay M., Ozdal B., Bilge U., Mollamahmutoglu L.

Dr. Zekai Tahir Burak Woman Health Education and Research Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ankara, Turkey


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Aim. To assess the effect of hysterectomy, performed for non-malignant pathologies, on symptoms and quality of life, and to identify adverse effects at 3 months and 6 months after surgery.
Methods. This was a prospective cohort study, carried on 66 women ages ranging between 40-77 years, that underwent hysterectomy, for non-malignant conditions. Patients enrolled in the study, completed a personal interview at the time of hysterectomy and 3 months later. lnterviews by telephone were performed at 6 months of treatment. Patients also completed a self-administered questionnaire, at the time of hysterectomy and at 3 and 6 months after surgery. This questionnaire was developed, to collect data of the potential benefits and side effects of hysterectomy, in consultation with a women’s health psychologist and an epidemiologist with expertise in questionnaire design. Clinical and hospitalization data were obtained from physician reports and from a statewide hospital data base. The Beck Depression Inventory Scale was also administered at the onset of the study and at 3 months after surgery, in consultation with a women’s health psychologist. The primary outcomes of interest were symptoms relief and the development of new symptoms or problems during the course of the study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for Windows Version 11.0.
Results. The most frequent symptoms before surgery were abnormal bleeding (51.5%), pelvic pain (24.2%) and urinary problems (18%). The most frequent indications for hysterectomy were recorded as leiomyomas (72.7%), total prolapse (9.l%) and menometrorhagia (3%). After performing hysterectomy, significant improvement was observed in a range of symptoms, including pelvic pain(p=0.001), abnormal bleeding (p=0.001), urinary symptoms (p=0.01), and sexuel dysfunction (p=0.046). Significant improvement in scores of Beck Depression Inventory Scale was also evident at 3 months after surgery (p=0.016). New symptoms detected after hysterectomy, included hot flushes (45.5%), fatigue (21.2%) anxiety (21.2%), and insomnia (15.1%).
Conclusion. Hysterectomy is a highly effective operation for relief symptoms associated with common non-malignant gynecologic conditions. The relief of symptoms following hysterectomy, is associated with a marked improvement in quality of life. New symptoms and clinical findings are reported in a limited number of women , after hysterectomy.

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