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CURRENT ISSUEMINERVA GASTROENTEROLOGICA E DIETOLOGICA

A Journal on Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Dietetics

Indexed/Abstracted in: CAB, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Emerging Sources Citation Index

Frequency: Quarterly

ISSN 1121-421X

Online ISSN 1827-1642

 

Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica 2015 December;61(4):267-71

OVERLAPPING GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASES 

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Celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity and inflammatory bowel disease

Casella G. 1, Di Bella C. 2, Salemme M. 3, Villanacci V. 3, Antonelli E. 4, Baldini V. 5, Bassotti G. 6

1 Gastroenterology and Hepatology Unit, Medical Department, Desio Hospital, Desio, Monza e Brianza, Italy;
2 Pathology Department, Desio Hospital, Desio, Monza e Brianza, Italy;
3 Institute of Pathology, “Spedali Civili” Brescia, Brescia, Italy;
4 Gastro‑Intestinal Unit, Perugia General Hospital, Perugia, Italy;
5 Medical Department, Desio Hospital, Desio, Monza e Brianza, Italy;
6 Gastro‑Intestinal and Hepatology Section, Department of Medicine, University of Perugia Medical School, Perugia, Italy

Celiac disease (CD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn’s disease (CrD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic inflammatory condition of the gastro-intestinal tract. The prevalence of IBD in celiac patients has been reported as 5-10 times higher than in the general population. The possibility of the presence of CD in IBD should be considered in IBD patients with long-term iron deficiency anemia (IDA) not responsive to iron supplementation. Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is characterized by intestinal and extra intestinal symptoms due to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in subject without CD and/or wheat allergy. Patients with Crohn’s disease and SR-NCGS were more significantly affected by joint pains compared to UC patients (50% versus 11.1%). In Crohn’s patients, a higher percentage of fatigue (50% versus 38.9%) and headache (27.3% versus 22.2%) was evident. For the association between NCGS and IBD new studies are warranted and, at this moment, a gluten free diet (GFD) may be useful more in CrD than in UC.

language: English


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