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MINERVA GASTROENTEROLOGICA E DIETOLOGICA

A Journal on Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Dietetics


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REVIEWS  AN UPDATE ON EUS IN 2008


Minerva Gastroenterologica e Dietologica 2008 June;54(2):177-87

language: English

An overview of endoscopic ultrasound equipment

Leblanc J. K.

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Indiana University Medical Center Indianapolis, IN, USA


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Endoscopic ultrasound imaging technology has significantly improved over the last decade. Innovative design of equipment and devices has broadened the utility of EUS as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Lesions as small as 3 mm can be imaged and targeted for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). EUS imaging with the latest generation electronic radial and linear scopes is excellent and does not vary significantly between models. Miniprobes should not be used in place of routine EUS echoendoscopes when available and technically feasible. The drawbacks of ultrasound miniprobes are the inability to perform fine needle aspiration and the limited depth of imaging. Transpapillary intraductal ultrasound (IDUS) improves staging of biliary tumors and improves imaging of biliary and pancreatic duct strictures. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis or block (EUS-CPN/CPB) can be performed with the EUS-FNA needle or a specially designed celiac plexus block needle which distributes the neurolytic agent into the celiac plexus in a radial fashion. Use of the core biopsy needle is safe and should be used with a therapeutic linear scope through the gastric wall.

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