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CURRENT ISSUEEUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events

Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
In association with International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM)
Indexed/Abstracted in: CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,063

Frequency: Bi-Monthly

ISSN 1973-9087

Online ISSN 1973-9095

 

European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2016 Oct 21

Test-retest reliability, internal consistency and concurrent validity of Fatigue Severity Scale in measuring post-stroke fatigue

Mohanasuntharaam NADARAJAH ,1 Mazlina MAZLAN 1, Lydia ABDUL-LATIF 1, Hui T. GOH 2

1 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2 The School of Physical Therapy, Texas Woman’s University, Dallas, TX, USA

BACKGROUND: Post stroke fatigue (PSF) is a common complaint among stroke survivors and has significant impacts on recovery and quality of life. Limited tools that measure fatigue have been validated in stroke.
AIMS: The purpose of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) in patients with stroke.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.
SETTING: Teaching hospital outpatient setting.
POPULATION: 50 healthy controls (mean age = 61.1 ± 7.4 years; 22 males) and 50 patients with stroke (mean age = 63.6 ± 10.3 years; 34 males).
METHODS: FSS was administered twice approximately a week apart through face-to-face interview. In addition, we measured fatigue with Visual Analogue Scale-Fatigue (VAS-Fatigue) and Short Form-36v2 (SF-36) vitality scale. We used Cronbach alpha to determine internal consistency of FSS. Reliability and validity of FSS were determined by Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Spearman correlation coefficient ®.
RESULTS: FSS showed excellent internal consistency for both stroke and healthy groups (Cronbach alpha > .90). FSS had excellent test-retest reliability for stroke patients and healthy controls (ICC = 0.93 and 0.90 respectively). The scale demonstrated good concurrent validity with VAS-Fatigue (all r > .60) and a moderate validity with the SF36-vitality scale. Further, FSS was sensitive to distinguish fatigue in stroke from the healthy controls (p < .01).
CONCLUSIONS: FSS has excellent internal consistency, test-retest reliability and good concurrent validity with VAS-F for both groups.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: This study provides evidence that FSS is a reliable and valid tool to measure post-stroke fatigue and is readily to be used clinical settings.

language: English


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