Home > Journals > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine > Past Issues > Articles online first > European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2016 May 12

CURRENT ISSUEEUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE

A Journal on Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation after Pathological Events


Official Journal of the Italian Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (SIMFER), European Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM), European Union of Medical Specialists - Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Section (UEMS-PRM), Mediterranean Forum of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (MFPRM), Hellenic Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EEFIAP)
In association with International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM)
Indexed/Abstracted in: CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,063

 

European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2016 May 12

language: English

Perceptive rehabilitation and trunk posture alignment in patients with Parkinson Disease: a single blind randomized controlled trial

Michelangelo MORRONE 1, Sandra MICCINILLI 1, Marco BRAVI 1, Teresa PAOLUCCI 2, Jean M. MELGARI 3, 4, Gaetano SALOMONE 3, Alessandro PICELLI 5, Ennio SPADINI 6, Alberto RANAVOLO 7, Vincenzo M. SARACENI 2, Vincenzo DI LAZZARO 3, Silvia STERZI 1

1 Unit of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine, Campus Bio­Medico University, Rome, Italy; 2 Unit of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Umberto I Hospital, “La Sapienza” University, Rome, Italy; 3 Unit of Neurology, Neurophysiology, Neurobiology, Department of Medicine, Campus Bio­Medico University, Rome, Italy; 4 Movement Disorder Service, Neurology, Azienda Ospedaliera di Treviglio, Treviglio (BG), Italy; 5 Neuromotor and Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Center, Department of Neurological, Biomedical and Movement Sciences, University of Verona, Verona, Italy; 6 Neuromotor Rehabilitation Unit, S. Filippo Neri Hospital, “La Sapienza” University, Rome, Italy; 7 INAIL, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Hygiene, Monte Porzio Catone, Rome, Italy


FULL TEXT  REPRINTS


BACKGROUND: Recent studies aimed to evaluate the potential effects of perceptive rehabilitation in Parkinson Disease reporting promising preliminary results for postural balance and pain symptoms. To date, no randomized controlled trial was carried out to compare the effects of perceptive rehabilitation and conventional treatment in patients with Parkinson Disease.
AIM: To evaluate whether a perceptive rehabilitation treatment could be more effective than a conventional physical therapy program in improving postural control and gait pattern in patients with Parkinson Disease.
DESIGN: Single blind, randomized controlled trial.
SETTING: Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine of a University Hospital.
POPULATION: Twenty outpatients affected by idiopathic Parkinson Disease at Hoehn and Yahr stage ≤ 3.
METHODS: Recruited patients were divided into two groups: the first one underwent individual treatment with Surfaces for Perceptive Rehabilitation (Su-Per), consisting of rigid wood surfaces supporting deformable latex cones of various dimensions, and the second one received conventional group physical therapy treatment. Each patient underwent a training program consisting of ten, 45-minute sessions, three days a week for 4 consecutive weeks. Each subject was evaluated before treatment, immediately after treatment and at one month of follow-up, by an optoelectronic stereophotogrammetric system for gait and posture analysis, and by a computerized platform for stabilometric assessment.
RESULTS: Kyphosis angle decreased after ten sessions of perceptive rehabilitation, thus showing a substantial difference with respect to the control group. No significant differences were found as for gait parameters (cadence, gait speed and stride length) within Su-Per group and between groups. Parameters of static and dynamic evaluation on stabilometric platform failed to demonstrate any statistically relevant difference both within-groups and between-groups.
CONCLUSIONS: Perceptive training may help patients affected by Parkinson Disease into restoring a correct midline perception and, in turn, to improve postural control.
CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Perceptive surfaces represent an alternative to conventional rehabilitation of postural disorders in Parkinson Disease. Further studies are needed to determine if the association of perceptive treatment and active motor training would be useful in improving also gait dexterity.

top of page